Monday 30 May 2016, 8pm

Baba Yaga’s Hut Presents: PIKACYU*MAKOTO + Adrena Adrena

No Longer Available

PIKACYU*MAKOTO is an alliance between two figureheads of underground Japanese psych/pop, the musically promiscuous Kawabata Makoto (most famous for his leadership of the legendary Acid Mothers Temple), and Afrirampo's Pikacyu.

No strangers to one another, the pair have not only gigged together with their respective bands but also recorded together, when these two outfits temporarily fused in 2005 to become Acid Mothers Afrirampo (releasing an album of the same name). Now they have distilled their collaboration, all other players being stripped away to leave the core of Pikacyu's manic drums and vocals, and Makoto's schizoid guitar conjurings.

“Theirs is a careening cartoon world, borne out of a restless creativity and a seemingly endless reserve of energy that sweeps in broad strokes across a series of diverse experimental duets.” – Rock-A-Rolla, review of ‘OM Sweet Home : We Are Shining Stars From Darkside

Adrena Adrena

A collaboration between drummer E-Da Kazuhisa (Boredoms, Seefeel) and visual artist Daisy Dickinson, ‘Adrena Adrena’ cuts a raw blend of drums, noise and organic visual work. Adrena Adrena as a live performance features an 8ft white sphere with video mapped onto it. Kazuhisa plays drums and noise while Dickinson live mixes visuals onto the ball. 

Their debut was at the International Festival of Projections in early 2016 and have since performed at End of The Road Festival, Supernormal Festival, Fort Process Festival, Zorofest in Leipzig and other shows across the UK and Europe with Acid Mothers Temple and members of Wire and Bo Ningen. The pair completed a short film in 2016. 'Man on the Hill', which has since been featured on the British Council Film website and in 2016 was nominated for The BFI London Film Festival, Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival, BAFTA qualifying Aesthetica Film Festival, The London Experimental Festival, Vienna Independent Short Film Festival and the London Short Film Festival. 

"The centre of the stage was taken up by projections which, always simple and often semi-abstract, never stole the limelight from the music. It was more like watching a trio, just one at work on different senses to the others. Pretty soon you weren't taking in the sights and sounds as separate elements at all, but hand been induced into a kind of synaesthesia. And if that seems like we're reverting to Sixties terminology like 'trip' we might as well go with it.... it felt like a trip (man), like being taken through some other reality then dumped back in ours at the end." - Gavin Burrows (Lucid Frenzy)