Thursday 7 April 2016, 8pm

Penultimate Press & Kye present: Graham Lambkin & Astor + Hour House

No Longer Available

Great to have Graham Lambkin and Astor back at OTO, joined on the bill this time around by Australia's Hour House. 

Despite having worked together closely over the last decade, realizing the publication of numerous books, LPs and CDs through their respective imprints, the one thing Graham Lambkin and Mark Harwood have never done is share a live stage. This will be a unique opportunity to see these two artists come together in an unscripted, unbounded and unpredictable performance setting, and a not to be missed opportunity for lovers of marginal music.

Graham Lambkin

Graham Lambkin is a multidisciplinary artist based in Upstate New York, who first came to prominence in the early 90′s through the formation of his music group The Shadow Ring. Combining a D.I.Y. post-punk ethic with folk music, cracked electronics, and surreal wordplay, The Shadow Ring created a unique hybrid sound that set them apart from their peers and continues to show as an influence today.

Following the dissolution of The Shadow Ring Lambkin embarked on a series of striking and highly original solo releases, including Salmon Run (2007) and Amateur Doubles (2012), a critically acclaimed trilogy with experimental tape musician Jason Lescalleet: The Breadwinner (2007), Air Supply (2010) and Photographs (2013), and Making A (2013) a collaboration with renowned table-top guitarist and founding member of the AMM group, Keith Rowe. His latest release, Schwarze Riesenfalter sees Lambkin paired with Wandelweiser composer Michael Pisaro in a musical reimagining for the texts of Georg Trakl.

Lambkin also curates the Kye label, which, since it's conception in 2001 has published audio work by contemporary artists such as Vanessa Rossetto, Malcolm Goldstein, and Joe McPhee, as well as archival collections from the likes of Henning Christiansen, Moniek Darge and Anton Heyboer.

Lambkin’s reputation as a visual artist came into focus during the 1990′s, designing record sleeves, t-shirts, posters/flyers for a slew of underground labels and bands including The Dead C, Harry Pussy, and Double Leopards. His playful combination of figurative and abstract elements lend Lambkin’s work a jarring, dreamlike quality, placing childlike totems against a darker adult undercurrent. Five books of Lambkin’s art/text have been published to date: Unfocused Hands (2004), Dumb Answer To Miracles (2009), Dripping Junk (2010) Millows (2012), and most recently Came To Call Mine (2014) a sumptuous collection of illutration and prose for children. To date Lambkin has had his artwork exhibited in three solo shows: Came To Mine at Audio Visual Arts, NYC (2014), Marble On The Rot, at 356 Mission Gallery, Los Angeles (2015), and most recently Moon blows close at Kunstlerhaus Stuttgart, Germany.

Lambkin is has just released his fifth solo LP/2CD Community (Kye / Erstwhile) this Oct, and is working on a collaborative project with Tokyo-based conceptual artist Taku Unami for 2017.

Astor

Astor is the moniker of Mark Harwood, Australian publisher, event curator and sound artist who is now residing in London, United Kingdom. Under this guise he deploys a wide variety of techniques including field recording, musique concrete, electronics and spatialisation. All of these forms are approached with a sense of bypassing the cliches imbedded within in order to coerce a sound world which is simultaneously contemporary, foreign, beautiful, unsettling and engaging.  Mark has released 2 acclaimed lp's on Kye (USA) and has a third 'Lina in Nida' on Penultimate Press (UK). 

Hour House

Australia's Hour House offer a musical blueprint marinated in mystery, beauty, sound, and song. Hour House is the duo of Mark Leacy and Sam Kenna, formerly of the Newcastle-based outfit Castings. Their debut LP Chiltern comprised individual tracks folded into two side-long suites in a unique excursion through foreign encounters, warm surrounds, and disorienting comfort. Field recordings, electronics, samples, guitars, voice, and atmospherics all contribute to form a bewitching whole. Many questions are raised: is this a soundtrack to a mental experience or an altered take on a familiar reality? Is the third section based on the sound of a basketball court? Does the fourth form a song? Where do the original Soviet science fiction soundtracks fit into all this? Is this sound or music? Simultaneously ambiguous and accessible Hour House unfold a consciousness-tickling ride unlike any other.