Nate Wooley & Seymour Wright - About Trumpet and Saxophone



About Trumpet and Saxophone brings together New York based trumpeter Nate Wooley and London based saxophonist Seymour Wright for a series of intensely material duo improvisations that inhabit the tricky overlap between these two instruments. Recorded on their second encounter, there's an intriguing balance of freshness and reflection in the music here, one that matches their deep knowledge of improvised music's various pasts as well as their commitment to experiment and discovery.

"a spiky, raw collection of brief improvisations that see them pushing at each other rather than slipping into comfort zones . . . full of a palpable tension but somehow also very simple and unadorned . . . a fine set of recordings that showcase the act of improvisation in its bared boned glory." - Richard Pinnell, The Wire

"Wooley and Wright have both made extraordinary solo recordings: these duets might represent their sum and difference or their square root. About Trumpet and Saxophone is eminently worthy of close listening. It might enrich or impoverish a listener in a new way." - Stuart Broomer, Point of Departure

"if the history of jazz can be told via great trumpet/saxophone pairings (Bix/Tram, Diz/Bird, Chet/Gerry, Miles/Trane, Don/Ornette, Kenny/Evan...add your own favourites) separated by stylistic quantum leaps, then the pairing of Nate/Seymour might just represent the latest such leap." - John Eyles, All About Jazz

Nate Wooley / trumpet

Seymour Wright / alto saxophone

Recorded by Rick Campion at City University Music Studios on 4 July 2012. Mixed and mastered by Rupert Clervaux at Gray’s Inn Road. Edited by Trevor Brent. Cover painting by Geoff Wright (Svetlana, 1968). Music by Nate Wooley & Seymour Wright

Available as 320kbp MP3 or 16bit FLAC 

Tracklisting:

1. 1 - 03:27
2. 2 - 03:25
3. 3 - 03:15
4. 4 - 06:04
5. 5 - 06:48
6. 6 - 09:05
7. 7 - 06:15
8. 8 - 02:07
9. 9 - 04:23

Seymour Wright

Seymour Wright lives in London. His practice is about the creative, situated friction of learning, ideas, people and the saxophone – music, history and technique ­– actual and potential. This is an on-going, rigorous and exhaustive exploration of imaginations, instrument, spaces and strucutures. The energy of this learning is applied to various collaborations and contexts to access/share what he has called the ‘awkward wealth of investigation’.

His solo work is documented on three widely acclaimed self-released collections Seymour Wright of Derby (2008), Seymour Writes Back (2015) and Is This Right? (2017).

His current collaborations include: abaria with Ute Kanngiesser; a duet with Crystabel Riley; [Ahmed] with Antonin Gerbal, Joel Grip and Pat Thomas; GUO with Daniel Blumberg; The Experimental Library with Evie Ward; XT with Paul Abbott; lll人 with Daichi Yoshikawa and Paul Abbott, a 'new jazz' trio with John Chantler and Steve Noble; an on-going inter-textual quartet with Paul Abbott, Cara Tolmie and Will Holder; a trans-atlantic duet with Anne Guthrie, and, with Jean-luc Guionnet a project addressing an imaginary lacunae in Aby Warburg's Atlas Mnemosyne. Bits of his writing has been published in C//A, Sound American and The Wire.

www.seymourwright.com

Nate Wooley

Nate Wooley is one of the rising stars of the American experimental scene, a trumpet virtuoso whose musical explorations have taken him through ecstatic jazz, free improvisation, drone composition, and noise into a place very much his own, characterised by intense dynamics, an acute awareness of space, and a complex and organic sense of structure. Recent collaborators include John Zorn, Chris Corsano, Akron/Family, Peter Evans, Wolf Eyes, Joe Morris, and Evan Parker.

“A word or two is in order about Wooley’s approach to his instrument. While the spatial innovations of Bill Dixon and Wadada Leo Smith are certainly referenced, the humor of Lester Bowie is also in evidence, and I even hear the chronologically disparate but equally luscious tones of Tony Friscella and Arve Henrikson on occasion. An extraordinary listen.” - Marc Medwin, Dusted Magazine